Liverpool’s Merseyside derby dominance means nothing, says

Jurgen Klopp insists Liverpool’s long period of dominance in the Merseyside derby will mean nothing when Everton visit Anfield on Saturday.

Liverpool have lost just once in their past 28 meetings with their local rivals, whose 2-0 victory at Anfield in February 2021 came during the Covid era, when the stadium was closed to fans.

That result was only Everton’s second win at Anfield since 1995, as well as Klopp’s only loss in 17 derby matches as Liverpool boss.

Liverpool have underlined their superiority over their neighbours by winning three of the past four encounters.

But Klopp says his side would be foolish to underestimate Sean Dyche’s team in the latest instalment of their fierce rivalry.

“It is rather uncomfortable if you tell me about my good record because it doesn’t matter,” he said on Friday.

“We try to make sure we don’t think about these things but make sure we are ready.

“We understand the importance of the game. I can’t remember one moment when I said ‘weekend derby’ and enjoyed this thought.”

Fourth-placed Liverpool have made a strong start to the season, with five wins from eight games, while Everton are languishing in 16th place.

Dyche’s men have won two of their past three games to climb out of the relegation zone and Klopp warned his players to expect fired-up opponents.

“There is a lot of intensity even before the first ball is kicked — you have to channel that in the right areas and play the game you want,” said Klopp, who is likely to be without Andy Robertson for several months, with the left-back facing shoulder surgery.

“The facts are Everton are in a good moment. They stayed up last season when it was not easy and the last few weeks they’ve had good results. They definitely deserve the respect.”

Klopp’s rejuvenated midfield does not have prior experience of playing in the derby — Alexis Mac Allister, Dominik Szoboszlai, Ryan Gravenberch and Wataru Endo all arrived in the close season.

However, the German is confident that they are used to playing in tough situations.

“It is a special game no doubt but a high-pressure game and they all played them. Macca played the World Cup with Argentina, Dom played Serbia recently in a super-important, high-pressure game so they are all used to the kind of game,” he said.

“The exact game, not, but I cannot show them a movie of derbies and say that is how they should be. I don’t think we have to make it too big.”

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